Hinged Dance Company.

Hinged Dance Co was founded by choreographer Taira Foo to bring the narrative ballet art-form into the 21st century. Taira Foo is known for her rapid-fire, high-energy choreography, delivering powerful emotional performances whether in moments of weightless stillness or intense physicality. Reviews of her recent work Rainman hailed it as "Gripping", "Intensely moving", "One million miles an hour stuff", "Imaginative and brilliant to watch". Her work draws on strong contemporary and street-dance influences to create her own trademark style.

 

Projects.

Prisoner 466

The Soloist

Rainman

Flowers in December

‘The final work of the evening, HINGED’s The Soloist, was without doubt the most complete group performance of my Resolution! experience. Performed by choreographer Taira Foo’s mammoth cast of twelve dancers, this narrative work was attacked with dynamism and crisp precision. Power relationships flit back and forth as the protagonist, a violin player, seemingly conducts the chorus’ every move through the swish of his bow and ripple of his body. The performance was textured, complex, chaotic, pulsing, thrusting, bubbling and explosive…
— Lucy Jarvis
In Flowers in December, Taira Foo and Hinged Dance Co tackle one of the major issues of our times: the refugee crisis. The raw physicality of the street-based movement, the company’s trademark style, brings fear and the pain to the surface. Trying to get a handle on the issue in a 20-minute piece is a huge ask, and the narrative is at times overloaded, but the commitment of the dancers in bringing the reality of the refugees’ trauma to the stage was delivered with total honesty.

The few props: flowers, a portable wire fence and a block of stairs, are used effectively in a myriad of guises from tunnels to boats to prisons while Foo’s powerful movement gives the dancers the expressive tools they need. The shortcomings of the complex structure were easily outweighed by their searing performances.
— Maggie Foyer, seeingdance.com
 
 
Taira Foo’s ensemble piece is visceral, politically-charged physical theatre dealing specifically with the Syrian refugee crisis. A playful and loving family is swept up by a group of outsiders fleeing for their lives. With minimal props - a wire fence that becomes a cage, a tunnel and various traps - Foo conveys the panic, anger and fear of innocent victims caught in the crossfire of conflict. Tactile and violent, it is a full-blooded, in-your-face work of restless momentum, employing elements of streetdance, mime and bold gestures. If it suffers from being too busy and overcrowded with incident, the concluding moments are desperately moving.
— Neil Norman, theplace.org.uk Author